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Holi
Holi / Dhulandi
Holi is a religious festival celebrated by Hindus all over the world. Holi is considered as second biggest festival on Hindu calendar after Diwali. Holi is also known as festival of Colors. Places related to life of Lord Krishna are known as Braj re
Gangaur
Gangaur Festival
Gangaur is one of the most vivid festivals rejoiced with great enthusiasm and happiness all over the Indian state of Rajasthan. In the word Gangaur, 'Gan' is the synonym for Lord Shiva whereas 'Gaur' stands for Gauri or Goddess Parvati. But mainly, t
History Of Rajasthan
Introduction
Rajasthan is one of the 26 states of the republic of India, is situated in the north western part of India. It covers 342,239 square kilometres (132,139 square miles) is the largest state of the Republic of India in terms of area. Rajasthan lies between latitudes 23 degree 3' and 30 degree 12', north and longitudes 69 degree 30' and 78 degree 17', east. The southern part of Rajasthan is about 225 km from the Gulf of Kutch and about 400 km from the Arabian Sea. Rajasthan is bounded by Pakistan in the west and north-west; by the State of Punjab in the north; by Haryana in the north-east; by Uttar Pradesh in the east, by Madhya Pradesh in the south-east and Gujarat in the south-west

Rajasthan is the land of Thar Desert ( 58%), surrounded by beautifulAravalli hills Range, a land of Forts, and a land of ancient civilization in the banks of disappeared Sarsawti river. Rajasthan is one of the beautiful states of India which attracts very large number of domestic and foreign tourists. Jaipur the pink city of India is the capital of Rajasthan
History of Rajasthan
Rajasthan is the home of the Rajputs, a group of warrior clans, who have controlled this part of India for 1000 years according to a code of chivalry and honor akin to that of the medieval European knights. While temporary alliances and marriages of convenience were the order of the day, pride and independence were always paramount. The Rajputs were therefore never able to present a united front against a common aggressor. Indeed, much of their energy was spent squabbling among themselves and the resultant weakness eventually led to their becoming vassal states of the Mughal Empire. Nevertheless, the Rajputs' bravery and sense of honor were unparalleled.
Rajasthan- the land of royalty is a glittering jewel set in the golden sands of a barren deserts landscape. The light that reflects off the golden sands engulfs a land renowned for its vibrant colors, people in bright clothes and beautiful jewelry, living in cities dotted and dominated by towering forts and palace that rise from the sands like mirage.
State Tree is Khejri
Tourism
Endowed with natural beauty and a great history, tourism is flourishing in Rajasthan. The palaces Pink City Jaipur lakes of Udaipur and desert forts of Jaisalmer Chittor and Jodhpur are among the most preferred destination of many tourists, Indian and foreign. Tourism accounts for eight percent of the state's domestic product. Many old and neglected palaces and forts have been converted into heritage hotels.
Bajra is the main crop
Fairs and Festivals
Festivals of Rajasthan are very colourful and unique. Rajasthan has a fair for every religious occasion, for every change of season and for every harvest. Rajasthan comes alive with exuberant folk dances, melodious music and spectacular festivities. The prominent festivals of Rajasthan are: Pushkar Fair, Camel Festival, Mewar Festival, Nagaur Fair, Kaila Devi Fair, Mahavir Ji Fair, Teej Festival, Summer Festival, Gogaji Fair, Kaliteej, Ramdevra Fair, Marwar Festival, Dusshera, Gangoor Fair, Chandrabhaga Fair, Kolyat Fair etc.
Arts and Crafts of Rajasthan
As far as the field of Arts and Crafts is concerned, .Rajasthan is among the richest states in the country. May be it was a result of the war-like lifestyle of the people of Rajasthan which sharpened the creative senses,artistic skills and inspired them to create the most opulent and richest of treasures. Stone, clay, leather, wood, ivory, lac, glass, brass, silver, gold and textiles were given the most brilliant forms. As, Jaipur meenakari is famed for its delicacy and its use of colours. Rajasthan is rich in jewellery, each area having its own unique style. Some of the traditional designs are rakhri, tirnaniyan, bala, bajuband, gajra, gokhru, jod, etc. The ivory bangles, Lac bangles, Sandalwood and Wood, Stone Statues on religious themes are carved all over Rajasthan and in several cities. Other crafts like blue pottery, hand block printing, tie and dye, terracotta sculptures, painting on camel hide, embroidery, cloth painting, carpets, durries, inlay work on brass and wood are to be found all over Rajasthan.
Arts and Crafts
Wildlife and National Parks
The main wildlife sanctuaries and National parks in Rajasthan are
Keoladeo Ghana National Park (Rajasthan)
Wildlife Sanctuaries (Rajasthan)Talchaper
Ranthambore National Park & Wildlife Sanctuary
Sariska Wildlife Sanctuary
Desert National Sanctuary
Forts in Rajasthan
The ancient Forts in Rajasthan gives a message of brave flooded life and a brave stormy death of Rajput kings like Maharana Pratap, Rana Sanga. The emergence of the Rajput warrior clans in the 6th and 7th centuries played the greatest role in making the great forts of Rajasthan. Recently Five forts in Rajasthan have officially been nominated as Indian entries for the tag of World Heritage Site. The forts Chittorgarh, Kumbhalgarh, Ranthambore, Gagron and Amber are all located on the Aravalli hills Range , which also happens to be one of the oldest mountain ranges in the world. "All of them together tell a story about the way Rajput military architecture has evolved over time. It is almost a narrative which gives a lyrical history of Rajput culture and their interaction with Mughals and other neighbouring dynasties," said Shikha Jain, convener of the Haryana/ Rajasthan chapter of Intach, an organisation that seeks to preserve Indian art and cultural heritage. The forts date back to between the 15th and 19th centuries. While Kumbhalgarh, Ranthambore and Chittorgarh represent the architectural style of Hindu forts, Gagron and Amber represent a fusion of Mughal and Hindu architecture. In Chittorgarh and Kumbhalgarh especially, remains of the Mauryan era have been found. Amber represents the more evolved and mature form of Rajput architecture. Chittorgarh is also India's largest fort.
The forts date back to between the 15th and 19th centuries. While Kumbhalgarh, Ranthambore and Chittorgarh represent the architectural style of Hindu forts, Gagron and Amber represent a fusion of Mughal and Hindu architecture. In Chittorgarh and Kumbhalgarh especially, remains of the Mauryan era have been found. Amber represents the more evolved and mature form of Rajput architecture. Chittorgarh is also India's largest fort.
The forts date back to between the 15th and 19th centuries. While Kumbhalgarh, Ranthambore and Chittorgarh represent the architectural style of Hindu forts, Gagron and Amber represent a fusion of Mughal and Hindu architecture. In Chittorgarh and Kumbhalgarh especially, remains of the Mauryan era have been found. Amber represents the more evolved and mature form of Rajput architecture. Chittorgarh is also India's largest fort.
The five forts have been picked after an extensive study of forts all over India. Each represents a different era, different geographical area and different designs. Both Ranthambore and Kumbhalgarh are forest forts.






Folk Dance and Music
The forts date back to between the 15th and 19th centuries. While Kumbhalgarh, Ranthambore and Chittorgarh represent the architectural style of Hindu forts, Gagron and Amber represent a fusion of Mughal and Hindu architecture. In Chittorgarh and Kumbhalgarh especially, remains of the Mauryan era have been found. Amber represents the more evolved and mature form of Rajput architecture. Chittorgarh is also India's largest fort. The five forts have been picked after an extensive study of forts all over India. Each represents a different era, different geographical area and different designs. Both Ranthambore and Kumbhalgarh are forest forts. Folk Dance and Music
Rajasthan's dance and music is deeply lyrical. Its folk dances are an old art form and in many of them music and dance goes hand in hand, for example the phad or the painted ballad, has a male musician and a female dancer, reciting the story together. Group singing or taalbandi is also a unique form of narration common to Rajasthani music. The maand is perhaps the most famous export of Rajasthani music, honed in the courts of the erstwhile royalty, it has a haunting beauty and an innate sophistication. Think of a Rajasthani dance and it conjures up images of women in voluminous skirts twirling around fires at night time under a black desert sky and whatever else your imagination may serve up, you wont be disappointed, the dances are mystical and compelling and very many to choose from. Rajasthan has a total area of 343,000 sq km and the most striking feature of this land is its division by the majestic Aravalli range which runs from north-east to south-west for about 688 km. It is the backbone of the state ad divides it into two regions which totally different geographical features.
North West of the Aravallis are the Jodhpur, Jaisalmer, Barmer and Bikaner regions, it is the home of arid plains and the shifting sad dunes of the great Thar desert. Covering a total area of 196,150 sq km, the hard compact earth here is covered by shifting sand dunes and sparsely dotted with scrub and thorny babool. Water levels are very low and have been for so many centuries. The Italian traveler Manucci, one of the several visitors who came to this area and put their impression on record, came over to this region in the 17th century and noted :
"Wells are so deep that when water is drawn out of them with the help of oxen, those who set these animals to work beat a drum as a warning" that the pot is the mouth of the well and they are about to draw water" Yet this land with its relentless carpet of sand and arid desert is neither barren nor uninhabited. If anything, the dryness and the heat of this region, the colourless surroundings have driven the people to fill their lives with dramatically brilliant colours. In fact, the colourfully dressed women against the stark backgrounds in one of the first and most lasting of all impressions that one may have to this state. Nothing really seems to dim their zest for living.
The harsh dry climate has, however, forced the people to evolve a semi-nomadic lifestyle; when survival becomes difficult these people move out with their cattle to more welcoming pastures, some use their skills as folk performers to earn a livelihood. The wanderers leave their homes but carry the desert and its history in their hearts and follow each custom scrupulously. They may move far away from their land but never move away from their culture. When the desert is a little more welcoming it becomes a rearing ground for camels, cows and buffaloes. Lack of vegetation has been compensated for by the health of minerals that are to be found in several parts of this fascinating region. The other side of the hills is a land rich is vegetation. Aravalli, or, a beam lying across, has a greater presence here. Hard granite rocks, scattered hillocks, areas rich in silver, zinc and lead deposits.. There are also long stretches of dense forests, lush green valleys are fertile fields. This area is drained by several rivers - the most important being the mighty Chambal river which hurtles through the rocky terrain of the Hadoti region. Geologically, many areas in Rajasthan are older than the Himalayas therefore it was only natural that civilization came to Rajasthan much before it came to the rest of India. Excavations at Kalibangan, in Ganganagar district, prove that a fully developed and organized society was in existence in that area much before the Harappan culture. Numerous other prehistoric and proto-historic sites exits in Rajasthan.
The later history of Rajasthan is a history of various kingdoms and their regular wars with one another. It wasn't until the mid-sixth century that the brave Rajputs, warriors par excellence, came to dominate the region and wrote the most glorious chapters of history with their blood and blade. Rajasthan was divided into kingdoms and the valiant Rajputs kept themselves busy with skirmishes amongst the neighboring kingdoms or else they faced the Turks, the mighty Sultans of Delhi lasted Sultanate and later the Great Mughals.
Culture of Rajasthan
The brightness of its life, the legends of its heroism and romance are all captured in the vibrant and evocative music of this desert land. There is a richness and diversity in Rajasthani music which comes from a tradition that is old and undisturbed, and from a culture that has imbibed the best from its neighboring states of Sindh, Gujurat, Malwa, Mewar, Haryana and Punjab.
Music which rich evocative heroic plaintive and joyful governs all aspects of Rajasthani lives. The voices both male and female are strong and powerful. The numerous songs sang by the women reflect the various feminine moods and strong family ties that govern their lives, Peepli and Nihalde are songs imploring the beloved not to leave her or to return to her as soon as he can.
There are songs about the family comparing every member to the numerous ornaments worn by women. The festivals of gangaur and teej, celebrating marital bliss and the brief but splendid moonsoon of Rajasthan call for special songs without which no celebration is complete.
Men and women of Rajasthan sing devotional as well as festive songs. Songs by the saint-poets like Kabir, Meera and Malookdas are part of the folk repertoire. They are sung all night during the raatjagas (all night soirees spent singing devotional songs) which are held as thanks giving to a particular deity. The resonant singing of the Rajasthani folk is accompanied by music from simple instruments like the Baara and Algoza, that usally give a beat or a drone to offset the poetry.
Fairs and festivals bring an even greater riot of colour and music into lives of these desert people .Holi the festival of colours,brings forth the joyous,lively rhythms of the change and dhamal songs Marriage ,childbirth ,the visit of the son-in-law, all call for song and music. Even children have their own special songs called the saanjhi and the Ghulda. Favorites that are sung at all times are the Panihari Eendoni, the famous Kurjan Digipuri-ka-raja and the Rasiya songs of the Braj region.
The hard life of the desert dwellers made them seek means of making life more pleasant by developing their artistic talents. There are many traditional communities who are professional performers and their skills are handed down from generation to generation. The Bhat and Charans are bards, who could inspire the Rajput warriors with accounts of heroic deeds by whipping up patriotic flavor or even ridiculing the royal families with their satire.
The wandering balladeers, like the Bhopas who sing about the Marwar folk hero-Pabuji, travel from village with their phad painting and rawan hahha entertaining people with their ballad. There are many singing communities in Rajasthan known as the Dholis.. Also known by other names like Mirasis, Dhadhis, L angas, Manganiyars, Kalbelias, Jogis, Sargaras, Kamads, Nayaks or Thotis and the Bawaris.
Today their musician be heard all over the state and is pepular even on the national & international circuits. The best flavor of this rich artistic talent can be savored during various fairs & festivals of the state, especially during the Desert Festivals (Jan-Feb), the Pushkar Fair (Oct-Nov), the Marwar Festival (Sept-Oct) and the Camel Festival (Jan-Feb).